Raise Up

Move Up The Ladder with John Corcoran

April 22, 2020 Amanda LeFever Episode 5
Raise Up
Move Up The Ladder with John Corcoran
Chapters
Raise Up
Move Up The Ladder with John Corcoran
Apr 22, 2020 Episode 5
Amanda LeFever

John Corcoran, Director of Attractions for Ripley’s Believe It or Not! shares his favorite exhibits, what gets him up in the morning, and the one thing that goes a long way toward not only a fulfilling career but getting a Raise at your job.

John talks about his career and his passion for “making sure families have a great time on vacation." Then we dive into chatting about “if you’re passionate about what you do, some bosses will see it as loyalty, some will see it as dedication, or hard work but talking the talk and walking the walk is very valuable.”

It's so good, folks. Give it a listen now!


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Show Notes Transcript

John Corcoran, Director of Attractions for Ripley’s Believe It or Not! shares his favorite exhibits, what gets him up in the morning, and the one thing that goes a long way toward not only a fulfilling career but getting a Raise at your job.

John talks about his career and his passion for “making sure families have a great time on vacation." Then we dive into chatting about “if you’re passionate about what you do, some bosses will see it as loyalty, some will see it as dedication, or hard work but talking the talk and walking the walk is very valuable.”

It's so good, folks. Give it a listen now!


RAISE UP SHOWNOTES:

https://www.raiseuppodcast.com/5


Love the show? These sponsors make it possible!

MyPrep Partners

The World Leader In Nace Certification Prep Courses

https://www.mypreppartners.com/


John:

I got hit in the head with a wrench and I was bleeding all over. Oh yeah. I said, "do you really count that as not me being with the company?"

Amanda:

Hey there Raise Up Nation, you are not going to believe this, you thought we were having fun before, but we are raising the bar. Our guest today, my new friend, Mr. John Corcoran, is it Corcoran, is that correct? Did I say it right? Excellent. Has nearly 40 years' experience in the entertainment industry with Ripley's entertainment. Ripley's entertainment is the largest, and fastest growing international chain of museum type tourist attractions in the world. In the past 25 years, the company has grown from 12 attractions i n four countries, to a hundred plus attractions in 11 countries. And John's current role is the enviable role of attraction development director. And he's going to tell us more about that for the 31 Ripley's believe it or not's auditoriums around the world and a n e twork of over a hundred properties, which have seen over a hundred million guests since 1933. He provides leadership program and project management and talent development for both brands. John, thank you so much for coming on the show. I'm honored and excited to chat with you today. How are you doing?

John:

I'd say under the circumstances we're in today, I'm doing just, wonderful , quite the introduction there. So I hope, I'm able to fulfill all those glorious sound bites .

Amanda:

It's all the truth. It's all the truth. So , I'll ask you real quick. You're in Florida, right? Is that right?

John:

Orlando.

Amanda:

Yeah. How's it going in Florida? Everything that's going on.

John:

Do you know the term of the day, flatten the curve ? In Orange County, which is where Orlando sits , we seem to be doing quite well. I would say more than flattening, but , a little bit out on the down-slope. Most people seem to be paying attention. Florida often gets the news for maybe having some outliers of society, shall we say, but so far most folks are being behaved , and it seems to be helping, which is good.

Amanda:

Oh, that's awesome. That's how I feel like it is up here in North Carolina, too. We're really trying to flatten the curve. We've been in self isolation, ourselves for about four weeks now. And so we're navigating what it's like to live with each other all the time, So that's been pretty interesting for our relationships, but it's also, there's been some good things, like a slower pace and, I'm hoping, I don't know. I'm hoping that we eventually all come out of this on the other side better, but it will take a little while, more or less. I feel like.

John:

That's my hope. I have seen some good things. Also, I'm on a board of our HOA and I see some community spirit coming back. I see people out walking around the community, or biking or, sweeping out the garage. And sometimes people just kind of come home, close that door and stay inside. And , some sensing a little bit of community, you are talking to your neighbor maybe from 10 feet away, but they're talking to their neighbor, which is a good sign. So, I think you're right. There's g oing t o be some good come out of this. It looks a little bleak right now, but I think there's will be some good come out of it, and that, that'll benefit us in the long run.

Amanda:

Yeah, that's true. Well, are you ready to talk about helping folks make the most of where they are, and kind of where they're going?

John:

I am ready and hopefully can provide a little bit of help for them .

Amanda:

That would be awesome. So before we start, I know you probably get this all the time, but please, please tell me what is your very favorite Ripley's exhibit?

John:

Well, I do get that question a lot, and I can tell you that the answer is different all the time because it's often , it's often, often influenced by what we've gotten recently. So , it's cool stuff, and Ripley's has such a wide collection that sometimes people don't realize we have historically significant objects. When John Wilkes booth shot Abraham Lincoln that night in Ford's Theatre, he was carrying matching Derringers, Ripley's owns one of those Derringers, kind of thing. A recent purchase that's super cool is we bought a collection of passports of Neil Armstrong. So, and they're spectacular in t hat they kind of show his life. I mean at t he first one, he's a student, and hardly goes anywhere. And then he gets something, I didn't even know exists, it's called a special government passport. And he got that when he was training for the Apollo program, and training to be an astronaut, I should say. And then, he got a diplomatic passport when he was in the official Apollo program because t hey did a lot of training in Ecuador and stuff like that. And, then post that, he had all kinds of travel, he started traveling the world giving speeches about this amazing journey on the moon and all that. So, it's not just a document, it really kind of tells s ome life history. Still, one of my all-time super favorites though is a board that has been painted. And there was a gentleman who spent about 15 years painting a board. So , everyday i t's just a little, it's a little piece of board, I think it was a t wo by six and he would paint it two or three coats every day. And what's really cool is when you cut it, you get this beautiful rainbow section because he used a gallon of white paint, and then a gallon of blue paint, and then a gallon of red paint. So, there's about 7,000 coats of paint on this board. So, the board is an inch and three fourths thick, and the paint is six inches thick. So, it's just a, it's a really cool visual and it's just a great reflection of people just wanting to do their own thing. And this guy just painted this board and he's created this really unique, cool piece with a wonderful story. And a great demonstration of what people are willing to do to be different.

Amanda:

Yeah, that's interesting that you would even think to do something like that though. Right? Like I'm going to paint this board and it's going to create this beautiful piece of art that's like, expressive in a unique way.

John:

Yeah. The classic beauty is in the eye of the beholder. So, it's wonderful that we get to celebrate that part of humanity.

Amanda:

That's true. So, my friend Neil, he said that , this is the only job you've ever had, which is going to be super interesting to our listeners because that's what we're all about. Finding the best jobs and getting paid what we're worth. And you obviously feel like this is a good one. So what do you love so much about Ripley's, tell me a little bit about this journey, I guess, of where you started in and, where you are now?

John:

Sure, a small clarification, probably the only real job I've ever had. I did own businesses for a while sort of thing. So, it was a summer job in college. I got hired at a seasonal, mini museum that the company had to take tickets. I, it's a funny story that I tell people, I needed an easy job because I had broken my hand working at a grocery store, which was my high school college trade, coming up was I worked at grocery stores, s o, I broke my hand. So, I needed something easy to do. So, I got hired to take tickets, and clean the glass, and that was something I could do with a cast on my h and. So, it worked out okay. And it just worked up from there. A little bit of hard work, and some things we'll talk about today, and got into the management training program and, moved to about 10 or 15 different attractions around the country. I got started building attractions. I got put in charge of all of our development, got put in charge of all of our operations. Actually left, did some things on my own for a w h ile, a nd then came back ki nd o f j ust for more creative role. So, working more in developing and improving those products we have.

Amanda:

That's amazing. So what has been kind of your favorite position as you've moved around?

John:

Well, operations is interesting and, bless the people who do it, but , if you get a chance to be in a creative role and you like that, that's really the thing to do. I mean, I always jokingly say no one ever stands in front of a business and says, "I put four and a half percent on the profit margin there," but people will stand in front of something and say, "I built that." And, so having that ability of making things better , so great guy in our industry and, he says, "look, we have a wonderful job," our job is to entertain people, and we don't pollute the skies or poison the rivers. So, my job when I get up in the morning is to make sure families are having fun when they're on vacation. That's, that's a pretty good job. You still have to do reports and safety things and all that. But that's ultimately, that's the reason we get up in the morning. That's a pretty darn good reason to get up in the morning.

Amanda:

Yeah. So, whenever you kind of started embarking on this journey with Ripley's, what do you feel like set you apart? It sounds like you've moved up throughout the ranks and you've worked really hard and so, what do you feel like was the difference maker for you?

John:

I feel like it was at that very first stop because I got hired to, like I said, take tickets and clean the glass. And it was interesting in that, Ripley's owned the business, but we were on someone else's property and it was an amusement pier. So, you could either, the way you came into the attraction was you bought tickets. Think back to the old days when you went to the amusement piers, and the roller coaster was five tickets, and the merry-go-round was two tickets. And so we took those p ier tickets, and then at the end of the day, the p ier would come and take that bag of tickets, and then they would send us a report saying how many tickets were in there. And I remember getting the reports sometimes and going, I thought we were a lot busier yesterday, things like that. So, I found a turnstile with a counter on it, hidden sort of like in a closet in the back. And so I installed this turnstile, and then each day I would write down the numbers that were on the turnstile, and I would compare them to the numbers that the pier was giving us. And I started sending that to my boss and saying, look, I think there's something wrong here. So, he went, wow, guys, looking after my money k ind o f thing. So, and again, I think, look, I think a lot of it was hard work because, I found some supplies and tools and when I got the cast off my hand, I started painting stuff on the slow days. There wasn't a whole lot to do and I was getting paid by the hour, so I didn't mind coming in an hour early and paint, and something t hat, that seemed like a good job. So, y eah, so I think it was that caring and willing to work hard, that'll go a long way.

Amanda:

Yeah, absolutely. I feel like intuition that we're in kind of with COVID-19, that there's a lot of people that are working from home, working remotely. And then there's a lot of people that are searching now for employment. So I feel like whenever we talk about getting a raise, or approaching your boss that now is not necessarily a good time to go and have those types of conversations, but it is the right time to kind of go above and beyond. Do you feel like that could be, I don't know that that might be true or not right now in this situation?

John:

Yeah, no, I think it is certainly, I think, for the listeners, maybe make some notes and bring it up in a few months, c ause I'm not sure if now's the time to do it. Most pays are g oing the other way. But I think that yes, I think you can stand out as, loyal and dedicated and, your big question about, what do you do to get a raise? And I m e an, my answer is, make yourself worth more, whether that's through working more harder work, learning something, p roving that you can do this, can you do two jobs because then, I mean, granted so many hours in a week and yo u g o t t o f ind that life work balance. But if you have the skill to cover a couple of jobs, then maybe there's some value there for the company, that sort of approach. But if you're passionate about what you do, then i t just comes through. I mean, some people see it as dedication. Some people se e i t as l oyalty, some people see it as hard work, but if you're passionate about it, it's w hat you talk about, and you w alk the walk, and you're willing to do that, then it comes across. And I think that's going to r eally help you a lot in t he long term.

Amanda:

Yeah. Do you feel like you've always been passionate about your position, your roles?

John:

Definitely. Yeah. I think when I first left that little museum and, got transferred to our management training program, I remember, the manager of the museum coming in at 8:30 in the morning and I was sitting at my desk and he said, "Oh, John, I thought you had the night shift." And I said, well, I do, but I just had nothing else to do and I got lots to do here, so just came in. So, I was supposed to work the three to 10 shift, but I just worked all day sort of thing, young and single, that sort of thing. So, if you're not in that position, make sure you find the right balance. But, that can certainly go a long way.

Amanda:

So, what is your best advice or you feel like , for somebody that's feeling a little bit undervalued, wherever they're working right now?

John:

It's a funny word because it got a bad name for a while, but, propaganda, are you proving that you're worth what you think you are? You know, and it doesn't mean you have to write up a list and send it to your boss every week of all the cool stuff you did. But , uh, but you might be doing weekly reports, so are you framing those correctly so that your boss sees that , look, you've set a goal, you've reached that goal, maybe even exceeded that goal or taken on some other things on the side. I know in my weekly report I have a few departments , that I take care of, but I always listed other. Yeah, it's just, when you've been around as long as I have, they will ask you to take a look at a few things. So, my boss likes to say, stick your nose in this. So, I always try to list that, right? Because it shows that, look, I've got this variability and I'm willing to step out and do a little bit more. And I am doing this a little bit more so that my list is not only maybe what you've agreed to do, but maybe a little bit more so, working harder, and you don't have to tell people you're working harder, but you just have to show them the results. Probably the best you can do.

Amanda:

Yeah. Because I mean there are some people that they're working harder, but they're working smarter too. Like they find new ways to do something that they've been doing. And that can be super valuable. I feel like.

John:

Agreed, especially if that working smarter, is saving the company some money because you have found a more efficient way to do something or reduce the cost on something then, obviously, that increases your worth. So, you got to find that balance. There are people who just keep working harder but not doing it the right way. And, you just , you'll never get out of the hole at that point.

Amanda:

Yeah. And you just get frustrated almost, I feel like, because sometimes it is a lot of hard work, but it's smart work, and it's innovating, and it's helping who you're working with. How is Ripley's doing right now? I know you guys are a museum. I mean, are you guys doing okay?

John:

I believe we have 113 attractions and 111 are closed. So , it is not, it's certainly not a great time. Like many companies, we've had to go through some rough times here with some, with some furloughs and everything. We sort of held on as long as we could, but, at this point, not knowing quite where you are, what's around the next corner. So, we had to make some tough decisions this week. And we are trying to be opportunistic with the crew we have here, "said what's that work we've always wanted to do that we can't do because our attractions are open 365 days a year." And, we've made a commitment to make sure that when we do reopen, every attraction has three coats of wax on the floor and every carpet is steam cleaned, because those are the kinds of things you really can't do when you run the hours we do. We have attractions that are open 15 hours a day, 365 days a year. So , it's hard to do some of that work. So, we're trying to be opportunistic where it's safe to do so , in following the governmental guidelines, and that varies by region, and everything. I think we're, to some extent, we may be coming out the other side as I believe our attraction in Korea has now reopened. So , maybe it's a rolling cycle. We'll see. But , certainly, certainly a ways to go.

Amanda:

Are you guys working on anything right now that you're hoping future in the next three to five years?

John:

We are , we've continued that work because we know, at one point, we'll have to do that. It'll be interesting when it comes back. We think to some extent, people are going to want to get out and do stuff. They're going to want to do it maybe in a little bit different environment, making sure it's safe and social distancing. So, we're taking a look at that. How can we adapt our attractions to make people feel comfortable about that? But also, that, to some extent it might be a competitive market. People maybe won't have as many dollars and if they're going to decide where they're going to spend their hard-earned dollars to entertain their family. So, we want to make sure that , that we've got something unique and it's the best possible way.

Amanda:

So, that sounds awesome. So, I typically ask the guests to share kind of their best war stories about getting a raise and whether it's you or someone else that you know. What's your favorite favorite story and can you tell me a little bit about what happened?

John:

The first thing that comes to mind was not quite a raise, because it actually had to do with some severance. When I did leave the company for a while, did some stuff on my own as I mentioned. But that first job I had working on that little amusement pier , for the sake of payroll convenience, I didn't technically work for Ripley's, reported to them, but I was on the other company's payroll. So , I never got service time for that. So, when there was some talk of severance, they pointed out my service time and I said, "Well, no, that's not right. It should be this". And the VP at the time said, "no, sorry, that doesn't count." Well, the fellow that was president at the time, at this time, was a vice president when I was, when I worked at that facility one year when we were closing it up, because it was a seasonal attraction. We were trying to weatherproof the attraction and small industrial accident, I got hit in the head with a wrench and was bleeding all over. I was fine, I was fine, but it was a memorable situation. So , I went to the president and , we were just sort of telling war stories and I said, "Hey, I remember that time I got hit in the head with a wrench and I was bleeding all over. Oh yeah. I said, "do you really count that as me not being with the company?" And he said, "well, no, of course not." So, I used emotion to draw a reaction from someone and got myself a couple more year's service time. So , yeah. So, it was using a little bit of emotion to sort of, point out you r, l oyalty to company.

Amanda:

Yeah. So, maybe a little bit of a flaw in the thinking almost with the service time. Like because you did, you worked hard for them.

John:

Exactly. Yes, exactly. So, I think the other things, I generally look at are changes in situation, can you document something for me? I've moved around a lot, so I always had to look at cost of living indexes going from one market to another. You know, maybe if you're assistant manager one place, you're getting to be a manager in another place and it comes with an increase in salary, that's wonderful. Is it an increase in true salary or, did you look at cost of living index? Because sometimes t he same dollars might not buy you as much. So, always, always be aware of the situation, if it's a job change that requires something, I mean, it could be anything from, dress, to equipment, those sorts of things. So, just make sure that you're, comparing what the job is and where the job is too, where you were and making sure any adjustment i n salary is appropriate as well.

Amanda:

Yeah, I like that. Do you ever recommend talking about kind of the perks, like vacation time or anything like that when you're having those raise conversations or the performance reviews?

John:

I do, I think that sometimes , some things are very much fixed, the company, you get three weeks of vacation and you get at five years, those sort of things. So, sometimes those are difficult for, a supervisor to change, just because it's a company HR policy, those kinds of things. Yes . But, no, I think that's a good way to add a little bit more on value. Some companies really try to stick to a pay structure because, if you're a level 17 manager, that's what the pay is. So, how can you get something else out of that? You know, informal deals sometimes can have some value to them, without sharing too much, because maybe not everyone i n my company has the same informal deals I do. But , no, I think that's , a way to do it. I know staff that's worked for me, we've done maybe a small equipment purchase something like that, something along that line, it's a laptop, right? So now, you haven't changed your salary structure. You've helped someone out, it's still a business expense, you've just made their job easier. And I'm saying laptop back when everybody had a desktop only kind of thing you spring for a laptop for someone. So , some things like that I think yes, perks or something. It certainly, if you work for a smaller company, things like vacation are different , I know people that have done the, I call it the Northern workweek where, you work a little bit longer Monday through Thursday and you get a half a day off on Friday , because you want to go out and enjoy, and it's a summer thing, so you get a half day off in the summer , doesn't mean quite as much to us in Florida. But , I know some people have negotiated that in, so, that could be really important to you if you like to go camping on the weekend sort of guy, then , you think about the perks that you don't have, direct cost to the company. There's certainly , some benefit there, whether it's flexible working hours or, those sorts of things.

Amanda:

Yes, and I like the laptop, I think some people will do cell phones or small little things that they can help people out with that, it's not necessarily pay increase, but it is something else that improves your work and life. A little bit.

John:

Just this week I've been offering employees on the sly, and you'll have to wait to put this podcast up for a little while, but I've been offering, toilet paper. Okay, so I was cleaning out some of our warehouses and found something close to a hoard . So some of the staff, I was like, "Hey, how are you doing there?" I have some now, it's that commercial rough stuff. So, it's not perfect, it's certainly has some perceived value right now.

Amanda:

It definitely does. It's a hot commodity. I know that even up here it's really hard to find it in the stores. So, I can't even imagine in Florida right now.

John:

Yeah. It's just sort of funny thing what goes, we're used to panic buying down here because of hurricanes, but this has been a little bit different with the toilet paper going first. It's kinda crazy.

Amanda:

Yeah, I know they're making it as fast as they can right now it seems like, so I'm hoping that we can get it back and distributed out to everybody. Is there anything else that you'd kind of like to add to the national conversation about getting a pay bump , you think?

John:

Well, for some people now that are changing jobs, I think one of the biggest opportunities you have is at that hiring meeting, because sometimes , companies do a blanket policy and they say everybody's getting a 2% raise this year. That happens sometimes, but you've probably never had more of a chance to influence your salary than you do on the day you are hired. You know, where, you're interviewing for a position and they say, "Hey, the position pays 75," there's no better chance than to right that day to say, "Look, I think I'm really go ing t o n eed 80." And because remember for the next five, 10 years, however long you stay there, you're going to get 2 or 3% and that, that's just going to compound over time. And, I think that a lot of companies, sit down and say, "okay, we're going to hire this person and well, what's the pay range?" And they say, "70 to 80," and they offer you 75, and maybe they really got 80. And I think you can probably have the most influence over that on day one. Sometimes salary is a , you'll get this to start and then in 90 days it goes to this. So, maybe it's that 90 day adjust number, that you're talking about. But I think that first day, that there's probably a real opportunity to have a significant influence. I think if you've been there three, four years and they say we're going to give you a $4,000 raise, I think it's really hard to say I'd like nine. Right? Cause all of a sudden, that seems like 120% and five out of 75 when you start it, that's a, that's a little smaller number might be a little more palatable. So, really, really focus on that. A lot of people are happy to , I got that job now, but that's a good chance to really influence what you really earn for the next, because it's not five that year. It's five every year. You're there.

Amanda:

That's true. That's true. I didn't think about it that way. That's the first time that anybody said it like that. John, I really liked that. Do you interview? Do you interview and hire?

John:

I do. So, yeah. So, I'm generally we, when someone comes on board our company, we interview them a lot and we have a lot of people interview them. We have a unique culture, so we like to make sure they're a good fit. Generally, by the time someone gets to me they have the qualifications. So , a lot of it is about , getting the right fit and then, understanding how well they can fulfill that role within our company. So , I would say most people, you offer them a number and they're happy with that. You know, sometimes it's based on what you advertised and the sort of things , to some extent, can be a little bit impressed by the guy who says, "gee, I was really thinking this." Because it shows you that, he's willing to speak his mind , because you want that. If you're working on a project and you've hired someone for an expertise, well you really want them to speak their mind, that's why you're hiring them. So, maybe demonstrating that in your hiring session, that shows off a quality to your future supervisor.

Amanda:

A lot of people are talking about the fit and the culture. Is that really, you're saying it's really important at Ripley's as well? Like if you mesh almost with the team and , the company.

John:

Yes, it could be we have a unique culture, I think that , we've hired some folks, in hindsight that were , technically a perfect fit for the job, but just not the right fit. I mean, again, we're ultimately, we're in the family entertainment business and we may need an IT guy, or an accountant, but that's the business we're in. We live a service culture. We're here to take care of our guests. So, even if you're running the warehouse, you got to think like a service culture. Well, look, we need to get that piece out because our guests are expecting to see it. So , that fit's super important. You may have a small company and, maybe the culture is just you, but, if you don't get along with that person, then, you're not going to create a great team dynamic to grow that business. And I think that's everyone's goal.

Amanda:

Yeah. And it makes it just a lot harder to collaborate and for everybody to pull and push in the same direction. So, I love that we're shifting more and more to how important the culture is as part of these conversations and just where you're going to work and what that looks like during the interviewing process. I love that. I love that.

John:

It's important. So, that's another thing I try to take a look at with my staff and when I've interviewed , or had salary reviews is, what's the goal and what's my reward for getting there? So , sometimes I don't , to some extent, often your job is only worth a certain amount. You can be really, really good at that. But to some extent, look, if you're a cashier in the grocery store , you're never will make, $200,000 being a cashier in a grocery store. It's just the job w hen you can't influence the sale that much, you can be the best clerk that could be and you could get, inflationary raises and those sorts of things. But there may be a cap to your job. So, make sure i n t he salary reviews you're having a discussion about, well look, I think I can also do this and therefore if I get that, is there some reward for it. Maybe part of an incentive package or a bonus package. I t may not always be straight tied to salary because maybe you can't do that every year. But try to have that agreement of, ask your boss. I mean, if you're making $75,000 and you say, what do I need to do to make a hundred? Because, they may tell you that, the job's not worth it or well then you need to be able to do this and this and therefore you can become a department lead and that job pays a hundred. So, make sure there's a true understanding between you and sometimes it's a difficult conversation, but make sure there's a true understanding between you two, this is where I want to go, what do I need to do to get there? Is it more education, is it more experience, is i t taking on more responsibility? But this is where I want to be. Tell me what I need to do to get there instead of just saying, okay, you're going to go from $75 to $80 thousand this year. We find out what you need to do to get, where you want to be.

Amanda:

Yeah, yeah. I love that. So, John, this has been amazing and I am so grateful that you've taken the time to talk to us. I can't wait to see some of the new attractions whenever this all , we'll get back to, to normal, more or less and Ripley's will be one of the first places that we take our kids. And if you've enjoyed your time today and feel like you're getting some value, please consider sharing the podcast with your friends and your family and subscribing. You can even take a screenshot and share it on your social and then tag me at Amanda LeFever so we can connect. John , I just want to say thank you again one more time.

John:

If listeners are looking for little something to do to, they could check out our social media stream. We've been , posting lots of fun stuff. You can actually see me in a tour of our warehouse, so that's up on our Facebook page. So, get a behind the scenes tour. Strongly encouraged. If you're a star Wars fan, that's all I'll say.

Amanda:

Nice, that's awesome. I did not know that. Are you guys on Instagram too? Or is it all on Facebook?

John:

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, TikTok. We've got it all. Yeah.

Amanda:

So are you TikTok'ing?, Are you doing some TikTok videos?

John:

I have a TikTok account now because I follow the company and my daughter is making some inroads on TikTok and she's excited about that. So , trying to be young and hip to always need to keep in touch with what our audience is. Sort of an old guy who has been around forever and , I rely on a bunch of younger people in our department to tell me what's hip. But try to be cognizant of the fact that you're not hip so that you can, you can have someone tell you what it is.

Amanda:

That's amazing. So are you doing the video ? Are you doing dance videos John, I need to go look.

John:

Oh, no John TikTok dance videos?

Amanda:

That's awesome. Well, I will definitely check out Ripley's on Facebook and Instagram, you said Twitter as well and follow along. That's really cool that you're doing warehouse tours. All the little sneak peaks, some behind the scenes.

John:

Definitely to entertain the folks while they're at home. So , hope everyone is staying safe. Really, really unique time. So, enjoy your time with your family. Stay safe and if you get the opportunity when you do get out and vacation and your near one of our attractions , try to see if you can. We just promise you a nice, family friendly environment , and to have a great time on your vacation.

Amanda:

Yes, we will definitely becoming too, and I appreciate it so much John, and I hope you have a great night and I will talk to you soon. Thank you.